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Stotra Chanting Videos

Bhagavad Gita – Chanted in English like the Original Sanskrit

This versified translation follows the poetic meter of the original Sanskrit (anusthubh chandas) and is chanted using a traditional melody. The Gita’s 700 verses have been condensed to 349 English verses for brevity and clarity.

Morning Meditation on the Ultimate SOURCE of ALL

Shankara’s Pratas Smarana Stotram with line by line translation, chanted in Rag Bhairav.

Dakshinamurti Stotra of Sri Shankara

Lord Dakshinamurti is Shiva manifest in the form of one’s own guru. In this beautiful hymn of praise, Shankara weaves some the loftiest teachings of Advaita Vedanta. Each line is repeated twice for learning.

Annapurna Stotra of Sri Shankara

Annapurna Stotra by Shankaracharya, in praise of Goddess Parvati as Annapurna, the giver of worldly and spiritual nourishment. Each line is chanted twice for learning.

Guru Stuti

Guru Stuti is a selection of verses drawn from various sources which are often recited together to praise one’s guru. Each line is repeated twice for learning.

Guru Paduka Stotra

The Guru Paduka Stotra, attributed to Sri Shankara, praises one’s guru by offering salutations to his or her holy sandals – paduka. Each line is repeated twice for learning.

Guru Stotra

The Guru Stotra is a well-known hymn in praise of one’s guru. Each verse ends with the refrain, tasmai – unto him, shri-gurave – unto the guru, namah – salutations. Each line repeated twice for learning.

Mahalakshmi Ashtakam

The Mahalakshmi Ashtakam, in spite of it’s name, is actually in praise of Goddess Durga, who assumed the powerful form of Mahalakshmi to slay demons. Each line repeated twice for learning.

Sadhana Panchaka of Shankaracharya

Sadhana Panchaka presents a series of twenty steps to be followed in one’s sadhana – spiritual practice. Each line repeated twice for learning.

Manisha Panchaka of Shankaracharya

The Manisha Panchakam is based on Shankara’s response to Lord Shiva in the form of a chandala (outcast) who challenged Shankara’s notions of ritual purity. When Shankara asked him to go away, Shiva as a chandala asked, “Should my body go away from yours, when they are both equally impure? Should my atma go away from yours, when they are both equally pure? Each line repeated twice for learning.

Shiva Manasa Puja

Shiva Manasa Puja, or mental worship of Lord Shiva, is beautifully presented by this hymn attributed to Sri Shankaracharya. Each line repeated twice for learning.